Intensions Consulting: Mental Health Literacy


The study, which surveyed 901 English-speaking Canadian adults, found a number of gaps in men's depression literacy, with over a third of Canadian adults (38%) incorrectly believing that having several distinct personalities may be a sign of men’s depression, and almost a quarter of Canadian adults (23%) incorrectly believing that men with depression often speak in a rambling and disjointed way.
"These findings highlight some significant misconceptions and literacy gaps around men's mental health" says Nick Black, Managing Partner at Intensions Consulting and one of the study co-authors. "Among Canadian adults, there appears to be some confusion between depressive symptoms and the symptoms associated with other mental illnesses."

On the topic of men's suicide a similar lack of literacy was found, with a third of Canadian adults (33%) incorrectly believing that men talking about suicide always increases the risk of suicide, and almost a quarter of Canadian adults (23%) incorrectly disbelieving that men who want to attempt suicide can change their mind quickly.
"Misconceptions about men talking about suicide increasing their risk for suicide invokes silences and stigma around men’s mental illness" says John Oliffe, Professor at the University of British Columbia and the lead investigator at Men’s Health Research. "Flowing from that, men with suicidal thoughts don’t feel safe to express what they are experiencing – and potential helpers tend to avoid such conversations fearing they might inadvertently trigger the man’s self-harm.”

Given the evidence that mental health knowledge can increase with education, which in turn reduces stigma and improves help-seeking behavior, the study concluded that more concerted efforts are needed to advance public literacy on the topics of men’s depression and suicide.

ABOUT THIS STUDY

These are the findings of an Intensions Consulting study conducted between August 29, 2014 and September 11, 2014 on behalf of Men’s Health Research at the University of British Columbia. For this study, an online survey was administered with a sample of 901 English-speaking Canadian adults between the ages of 18 and 83. The sample was stratified and weightings were employed to balance demographics, ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the targeted Canadian population according to Census data, and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. A traditional unweighted probability sample of this size would produce results considered accurate to within plus or minus 4.6 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. For a full copy of the published study and data tabulations, click here.

Intensions Study in Fusion

On March 29, 2016, Fusion published an article titled, 'Report: A quarter of Canadians think a computer program would be more ethical and trustworthy than their fleshy bosses'. Written by Ethan Chiel, the article discussed findings from our recent Intensions Consulting study on the Future of Work across Canada.
"Affinity for code-based beings is creeping slowly into the Canadian workplace". Image: Elena Scotti / Fusion
To quote from the article: "A recent survey found that a quarter of Canadians believe that a computer program could perform better than their human boss. The study, performed by Intensions, a Vancouver consulting firm, surveyed 2,299 adult Canadians (over the age of 20) over the last six months and found that 26% of Canadians believe an unbiased computer program would be more trustworthy and ethical than their workplace leaders and managers.”  

To read a full copy of the article, please click the link below:
- http://fusion.net/story/285999/canadian-workers-robot-bosses-beep-boop-i-want-that-report-on-my-desk/

Intensions Consulting: The Future Of Work

This month Intensions Consulting and Nikolas Badminton released a new study on the future of work across Canada. The study, which surveyed 2299 adults across Canada, found that a quarter (26%) of Canadian adults believe an unbiased computer program would be more trustworthy and ethical than their workplace leaders and managers. Among younger adults (those aged 20-39) that number was significantly higher, with 31% agreeing that an unbiased computer program would be more trustworthy and ethical than their workplace leaders and managers.
"This study has uncovered some challenging trends for the future of work" says Nick Black. Photo: VFS
For younger adults, who have grown up trusting and relying on technology, there seems to be a growing preference for automated leadership and management - with 34% preferring to be screened or hired, 33% preferring to have their job performance assessed, and 26% preferring to be managed by an unbiased computer program.

FLEXIBILITY IS FOREMOST

At a time of technological change and financial pressure, many people are also beginning to question the rules and norms that govern working life. The data showed that Canadian adults have a strong desire for flexibility in their working life, and if employers aren’t willing to respond, many would consider working for themselves.
"Flexibility and empowerment will be the new work currencies" says Nikolas Badminton.
The study found that 55% of Canadian adults would like their employer to provide extended leave opportunities, 45% would prefer not to work at fixed times (i.e. 9am - 5pm), 41% would prefer not to work at a fixed location (i.e. at an office), 34% would prefer to work from a remote or overseas location, and almost half (45%) would like to start their own business or work for themselves in the future.

FIGHTING FOR CONTROL

Finally, many people are also concerned that work is interfering with their personal lives. Whether it’s cutting corners to save time, or paying other people to do their job for them, Canadian adults are considering some unique ways to take back control at work.

According to the study, 37% of Canadian adults are concerned that work responsibilities are interfering with their personal lives, 30% are always looking for new ways to cut corners and save time at work, 25% think it’s fair to pursue their own projects and interests at work (i.e. developing a business or promoting their own brand), and amongst younger adults, 20% would consider paying other people to do their job for them (i.e. using Craigslist or Freelancer).

ABOUT THIS STUDY

These are the findings of an Intensions Consulting study conducted between August 21, 2015 and February 25, 2016. For this study, an online survey was administered with a sample of 2,299 English-speaking Canadian adults between the ages of 20 and 59. The sample was stratified and weightings were employed to balance demographics, ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the targeted Canadian population according to Census data, and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. A traditional unweighted probability sample of this size would produce results considered accurate to within plus or minus 2.0 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Intensions Consulting participates in VFS Digital Design Talks

Intensions Consulting was proud to participate in Digital Design Talks. Organized by the Vancouver Film School, the topic of our talk was Understanding Marketing Psychology and was designed to help students understand, "the hidden psychological motivations that exist beneath the surface of everyday social trends and human behavior."
I'd like to thank Louise Lee, and the everyone at the VFS Digital Design campus, for inviting us to share our insights on market and consumer psychology and how the design process can be informed by the Intensions® Model.

For more information on the event, please click the link below:

- http://community.vfs.com/oomph/2016/03/dd-talks-understanding-market-psychology